Lifestyle & Behavioral Choices and Organ Transplants

Tobacco

Lifestyle and behavioral choices lead to much pain and suffering in today’s society.  Below are some facts and figures to help highlight the destruction of two such behavioral choices – smoking and alcohol consumption.

Or do you not know that your body is a temple of the Holy Spirit who is in you, whom you have from God, and that you are not your own? For you have been bought with a price: therefore glorify God in your body. –1 Corinthians 6:19-20

  • Approximately 1 in 136 or more than 2 million Americans suffer from alcohol-related liver disease.  27, 035 deaths from alcohol related chronic liver disease and cirrhosis occur each year in the US 2001 – www.cureresearch.com
  • …Percent of adults who drank alcohol in the past year:  62.5% — www.cdc.gov
  • …Currently, nearly 14 million Americans – 1 in every 13 adults – abuse alcohol or are alcoholic. – www.wrongdiagnosis.com
  • …430,000 people die each year form tobacco-related diseases making smoking the leading cause of preventable death – www.aarc.org
  • …Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) is caused primarily by smoking.  Smoking is directly responsible for approximately 80 to 90 percent of all COPD cases.  COPD is 10 times more likely to kill a smoker than a nonsmoker. – www.texaslung.org
  • …COPD is the fourth leading cause of death in the U. S. and is projected to be the third leading cause of death for both males and females by the 2020. – www.copd-international.com
  • …COPD patients account for 60% of all single lung transplants. – www.lungusa.org

Lifestyle and behavioral choices lead often to organ failure.  Below are some facts and figures that highlight the cost on society, the possible agony of waiting for a replacement donor organ, and the economic impact of lifestyle and behavioral choices

What man can live and not see death? Can he deliver his soul from the power of Sheol?  –Psalm 89:48

  • …In social and medical venues, debate continues to focus upon alcoholism…smoking…and other behaviors as diseases or character flaws.  Such behaviors are associated with disease processes in many adults.  The Ethics Committee (United Network for Organ Sharing) has historically supported the conclusion that past behavior that results in organ failure should not be considered a sole basis for excluding transplant candidates.  However, additional discussion of this issue in a societal context may be warranted.  – UNOS Ethics Committee General Considerations in Assessment for Transplant Candidacy (www.optn.org)
  • Nearly 21% of all persons waiting for an organ transplant in 2003 were waiting for a liver (a 2% increase over the previous year).  Over 27% of all persons waiting for an organ transplant in 2003 that were waiting for a liver died, representing close to a 10% mortality rate among those waiting for a liver transplant. – www.ustransplant.org
  • …Over 4.6% of all persons waiting for an organ transplant in 2003 were waiting for a lung (a 3% increase over the previous year).  Over 11.6% of all persons waiting for an organ transplant in 2003 that were waiting for a lung died, representing over an 11.6% mortality rate among those waiting for a lung transplant. – www.ustransplant.org
  • …Average cost of a lung transplant in 2002, including evaluation, procurement hospital, physician, follow-up, and immunosuppressant pharmacological therapy — $343,000.  Average cost of a liver transplant in 2002 — $313,600.  — Milliman USA Research Report, July 2002

Better is a little with the fear of the LORD Than great treasure and turmoil with it. –Proverbs 15:16

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